Asexual women

Duration: 6min 49sec Views: 1401 Submitted: 31.08.2019
Category: Creampie
There's no doubt about it — we live in a highly sexualised society. Physical attraction is an important talking point, especially growing up, and if you're not discussing crushes and pulls, you can be viewed with suspicion. But a growing movement is coming out publicly to say "No, we aren't wired the same way as you — and that's just fine by us". Simone, 29, is part of that movement and she agreed to tell Cosmopolitan UK exactly what it all means.

A Story About You

Patriarchy Also Affects Asexual Women And We Need To Talk About It

Skip navigation! Story from Sex. Sex and physical intimacy dominate much of the mainstream conversation about modern relationships, but what if the act of making love moves you no more than filling in tax returns? For someone who identifies as asexual, this lack of desire may well be a hurdle they have to navigate if they wish to seek a romantic partner. Asexuality is a multifaceted orientation that describes a person who does not experience sexual attraction. There is a spectrum of ways people can identify as asexual, from bi-romantic — a romantic attraction to both men and women — to grey-asexual, meaning someone who may experience some sexual attraction but at a lower intensity or on very rare occasions. It is by no means a new phenomenon, but it has experienced a surge in interest recently thanks to greater awareness around sexual orientations and fluidity.

Asexuality

Asexuality is the lack of sexual attraction to others, or low or absent interest in or desire for sexual activity. Asexuality is distinct from abstention from sexual activity and from celibacy , [7] [8] which are behavioral and generally motivated by factors such as an individual's personal, social, or religious beliefs. Acceptance of asexuality as a sexual orientation and field of scientific research is still relatively new, [2] [11] as a growing body of research from both sociological and psychological perspectives has begun to develop.
Maybe you spent your teenage years waiting for the spark of desire to kick in, but it never did. You watched everyone else start pursuing sex, but your turn never came. Maybe you faked an interest, because you felt like you were supposed to be interested. You played along, maybe you even gave it a try, but the whole thing felt like a lie. Maybe you've never really felt straight because men never did much for you, but at the same time, you knew you weren't a lesbian because women never did anything for you, either.